The Hangover Part II – Completely The Same, But Exactly Different

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You take the good, you take the bad, you take them both and there you have The Hangover Part II, a movie that takes everything clever and amusing about its first part and turns it into something of a retread. We’ve seen it all before, and we certainly know the story: a few friends get way too drunk, wake up with no memory of anything that happened, and have to go on a fact-finding mission to recover the pieces of the night before. The film falls into the trap of its formula and can’t seem to get out. It worked in the first one because there’s no reason that any of that stuff should have happened – it wasn’t in the nature of those characters – but now it is in their nature, we’re taught to expect it, and there’s no reason it should have happened. Again. Maybe that’s funny to some people, but it belies the originality of the characters, characters I grew to love in the first film.

The Hangover was a character study, if you think about it. Yeah, it was a buddy movie, and a road movie, and a raunchy, R-rated comedy about a night of heavy drinking, but, at the risk of spoiling the joke, it was also about four guys with severe personality disorders learning about themselves. Given that, the film was interesting, and not just funny. It was a character-driven comedy, with dialogue carefully designed for the moment. Comedies are funniest when the situations are organic. The Hangover took that idea and flipped it on its head, making the punchlines the joke and the jokes the punchline, telling the entire film backwards, and placing our characters in situations that weren’t organic, but became organic because of another unknown situation that they had already been through. Part II does the same thing, but it’s expected, so the punchline that was the joke the first time around is now the punchline, but the situations they didn’t know about while they were drunk are still the punchline. It’s all about the payoff, but when there isn’t any buildup, how can we get the joke? Because we’ve heard it before? “Why the long face?” isn’t funny unless the horse walks into the bar.

When our film opens, Stu (Ed Helms) is marrying the gorgeous Lauren (Jamie Chung). Her father (Nirut Sirichanya) disapproves, probably because he saw The Hangover, but the plans go along anyway. Doug (Justin Bartha) and Phil (Bradley Cooper) are getting ready to go to Thailand for the wedding, and want to give Stu a bachelor party. Knowing that didn’t work too well last time, Stu instead opts for a “Bachelor Brunch” at IHOP. Not good enough. And as soon as Alan (Zack Galifianakis) is invited, it should be obvious to everyone involved that this isn’t going to end well. Of course, Alan was responsible for the mess in the first film, but he also saved the day, so, against Stu’s better judgment, he invites him to the wedding. They’re also given the task of looking after the bride’s little brother, kid genius Teddy (Mason Lee). They all go have a beer, and wake up hours later in a shady hostel room, with Mr. Chow (Ken Jeong), without Doug and, more importantly, with only Teddy’s finger, in the deep heart of seedy Bangkok.

Each character in the film is reduced to a simple version of the better characters they were in 2009. Doug is reduced to the conscience at the other end of the phone (remember Dwight Yoakam in Crank? It’s like that), and Mr. Chow is a sillier version of the effeminate gangster he used to be. He’s also pretty good friends with Alan. Phil is the only character treated with the same care as he was in the first film; he’s never been the better fourth of any of the group, but he’s a genuinely good man, and his parental care for Alan is still intact. Bradley Cooper does an excellent job in these films. I remember, in the first film, enjoying the child-like, clueless nature of Alan, and the way Zack G. played him as such. He never made fun of the character, and played it with as much conviction as Johnny Depp does Jack Sparrow, but here, the character isn’t charming anymore, and he’s a bit malicious; he’s no longer a silly man-child, just manic and unlikable. Stu, apparently, was given the proper amount of self-confidence by the end of the first film to pull any woman he wants, so he gets the picture-perfect Lauren, only to succumb to the same mess he did in the first film, almost to the letter. Instead of a good man in a bad situation, Stu just becomes a badly composed version of himself.

The Hangover Part II is well directed, just poorly written. Even the best-looking buildings can be poorly constructed. The absurdity and likability of the characters, most of them anyway, is compromised solely for eliciting laughs, and the situations aren’t   unique  or amusing anymore. It’s always sad watching a film you love become a bastardized version of itself for a paycheck. Of course, there’s always the caveat – The Hangover made me love these characters, and that was a character piece. I still do love the characters, and still do care about them, and I will see a third one, if it’s made, which it almost assuredly will be. I only hope that someone does something about Part II‘s horrendous screenplay. They need to return the characters back to their roots. Maybe Phil gets divorced, and the boys try to cheer him up? I’d see that. I heard rumors of a Mr. Chow spin-off, but I don’t see that working too well. Maybe it’s the way they left his character in this film, but I think that would just be a waste of time. Or, of course, Alan could get married. That’s a comedy in and of itself.

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How to Win at Online Slots Games

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Being a winning slot machine player is impossible. All slot machines are specifically designed in order to give the house a long term edge, so the house will always come out ahead if you play long enough. The only real way to counteract the house edge on slot machine games is to play a game with a really big jackpot, bet the max every time you play, and hope that you hit the jackpot. Then when you do hit the really big jackpot, guess what you do next? Stop playing that game.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not saying that you shouldn’t play slot machines. In fact, I think slot games, especially the really good ones, are a lot of fun. But you want to keep in the forefront of your mind that mathematically, what you’re doing when you’re playing a slot machine on a long term basis is paying for entertainment. You can calculate how much you’re paying for that entertainment by multiplying the house edge times your average bet times your number of spins per hour.

For example, if you’re playing a slot game with a payout of 95%, then the house edge is 5%. (The casino keeps 5% of every bet you make long term.) And if you’re average bet is $3, then you’re going to pay an average of 15 cents per spin to the house. (5% times $3.) Assuming you’re making 500 spins per hour, that game costs you $75/hour to play, which may or may not be a reasonable price for you entertainment. That depends on your bankroll.

Something else to factor into your calculation is how much the perks and bonuses you’re getting back from the casino are worth. If you’re playing in a land-based casino where you’re getting free drinks while you play, then you can subtract the cost of those drinks from you’re hourly cost. (Or you can add the cost of those drinks to the value of the entertainment you’re receiving–it’s just a matter of perspective.) My recommendation is to drink top-shelf liquor and premium beers in order to maximize the entertainment value you’re receiving. A Heineken can cost $4 a bottle in a nice restaurant. Drink two Heinekens an hour, and you’ve just lowered what it costs you to play each hour from $75 to $68.

Slot clubs also give back a percentage of your losses each hour, so definitely be sure you join the casino’s slot club and ALWAYS use your card to track your play. There’s absolutely no reason not to do this. Casinos also reward their larger slot players with comps like meals, show tickets, and free rooms, which all add up to reduce the amount of money you’re spending each hour that you’re playing on their machine.

So how to be a winning slot machine player? I’d sum it up by saying know how much it’s costing you to play each spin and each hour, take advantage of all the comps and the perks, and go for the big progressive jackpot.

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Stephen King’s Insomnia

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Stephen King’s Insomnia was first published in 1994 and like a number of King’s other novels, it is set in the state of Maine and in the fictional town of Derry. The genre of this book is not traditional horror but rather a supernatural or sci-fi thriller. Other aspects of the book are also somewhat unfamiliar to King’s normal offerings, firstly the book is very long at over 800 pages in length and also the main characters are all in their 60’s and older.

Even though Insomnia is in the supernatural or science fiction genre, King still manages to address a number of important issues whilst continuing uninterrupted with the book’s main story. Subjects such as abortion, domestic violence and women’s rights are all covered in such a way as not to detract from the entertaining storyline.

The plot of Stephen King’s Insomnia is rather slow to get going and things don’t really pick up pace until at least 100 pages in but this allows King to really create a cast of believable characters that the reader can empathize with throughout the novel. Ralph Roberts who is a retiree starts to have problems with insomnia and the condition deteriorates as he manages to get less and less sleep until he can’t sleep at all. Ralph starts to see things that aren’t able to be seen by other people such as people’s energy fields or ‘auras’ and alien beings that he calls ‘little bald doctors’ as a result of their appearance. Ralph also discovers that Lois Chasse, a woman he has feelings for is also able to see these alternate planes of reality and the alien creatures.

As with many of King’s books, one of the main themes of Insomnia is the fight of good versus evil and in this particular case the hero is Ralph Roberts who is a retired widower and a very ordinary and believable character who faces up against the Crimson King and his followers. There are a number of highly entertaining twists as King develops the plot, one in particular where Ralph is shown a piece of the future and has to make a life altering decision based on the vision, prompting the reader to question individual morality against self-preservation. As with many of King’s novels the ending isn’t all happiness however as the main protagonist is killed and is accompanied by the consoling remark that at last Ralph can rest.

Stephen King’s Insomnia had a very important part to play in the progression of King’s series of books because when Ralph defeats the Crimson King ultimately saving the life of the young boy Patrick Danville, it sets the direction for King’s Dark Tower series. Although the first novel in the Dark Tower series was published in 1982 and there were 3 books before Insomnia was even written, Insomnia introduces the reader to the pivotal character of Danville in the future Dark tower books.

Insomnia may not be a traditional Stephen King novel, it’s length, character composition and storyline pace are somewhat different to many of his other books, it is undoubtedly an enjoyable and thoroughly entertaining read.

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Stephen King’s Cujo

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In his partially autobiographical book On Writing (Scribner, 2000), author Stephen King admits that he was heavily into alcohol when he wrote Cujo (Viking; 1981). As a result, Stephen King’s Cujo lacks the true other worldliness that marks his best novels. Dog lovers will also be appalled at the description of the book’s title character – a gentle Saint Bernard that turns into a man-eating monster after getting bit by a rabid bat.

But still, a bad book by King is still better than a good book by most other horror and suspense writers, including Iris Johansen, Dean Koontz and Edgar Allan Poe. Stephen King’s Cujo offers some interesting tidbits for diehard King fans to discover. It’s set in a fictional town familiar to King fans, Castle Rock, Maine, the home for many King books, or is the town next door to the book’s action, as in Under the Dome (Scribner; 2009.)

Strong Characters

King’s great characters are his core strength. Even if a situation seems completely implausible, readers will still keep those pages turning to find out what happens to the characters. Stephen King’s Cujo is no exception. There is a town maniac, a beleaguered cop and a young couple with a small son trying to keep going after the wife admits to an affair. Even though King claims to have been drunk while writing the book, he has some touches that makes a character seem more real than a real person.

Even the title character is fleshed out. His unusual name gives a slight hint at the dark weirdness to follow. Cujo was named after one of Patty Hearst’s kidnappers, who everyone called Cujo but was really named Willie Wolfe. Cujo’s white trash owner at first doesn’t seem to be capable of making the logical leap to name his dog after a kidnapper, but then nothing in Cujo is quite as it first appears.

Problematic Plot

The main downfall of the book is the plot. Anyone who has kept dogs or bothered to learn anything about rabies knows that no matter how rabid a dog is, they do not become a Cujo. Although the book at times hints at otherworldly forces at play (such as the son’s persistent fear of a monster in his closet) they never materialize. This teasing with the reader goes on for quite a bit of Stephen King’s Cujo.

A good part of the book is taken up with the wife’s affair, perhaps in an attempt to show which was the worse monster – the guy she has an affair with or Cujo. But these two plot lines never merge, as they would in most other King books. This is another annoying tease for the reader to put up with.

Another stumbling block is that many problems facing the young mother and her son in their showdown with Cujo is that it just wouldn’t happen today in the age of mobile phones. Modern readers have to keep reminding themselves that things like the Internet, standard air-conditioning in cars and mobile phones did not exist back in 1981.

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Do Not Buy the “Rich Dad, Poor Dad” Book Until You Read This!

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Rich Dad, Poor Dad, Robert Kyosaki

“What the rich teach their kids- that you can learn too.”

What is the book about?

Rich Dad, Poor Dad introduces you to the basic principles of investing, explains why investing is so important, and explodes the myth that you need to earn a high income to become rich.

Who is this book written for?

If you have little or no financial education and want to learn the basic rules about investing, read this book!

Robert Kyosaki, a self-made millionaire, successful business owner and international best-selling author, teaches you about investing, by recounting the story of his financial education from two strong role models:

Poor Dad (his natural father), a well educated and highly paid government official.

Rich Dad (his best friend Mike’s father), a high school dropout and successful businessman

Each Dad had a very different attitude and approach towards the subject of money. One ended up jobless and in debt, the other, one of the richest men in Hawaii.

Robert describes, how as a small boy, he made the decision to listen to his Rich Dad who subsequently taught him how to think, act and become rich.

“One dad had a habit of saying ‘I can’t afford it’ the other ‘how can I afford it’…One statement lets you off the hook, the other forces you to think”

Robert writes in a simple, non-assuming style without complicated words and financial jargon. Through amusing stories and simple diagrams he explains the six basic lessons his Rich Dad taught him about money.

“Most of us learn about money from our parents, so what can poor parent tell their child about money? Stay in school and study hard? Schools focus on scholastic and professional skills but not on financial skills. This explains how smart bankers, doctors and accountants who earned excellent grades in school, struggle financially all of their lives”

I say:

Never read a book about investing? This should your first one.

I came across “Rich Dad, Poor Dad” completely by accident, in my local bank.

It immediately stuck out from the boring “money magazines” and after flicking through a few pages, I was so impressed (and surprised) a book about finance could actually hold my attention, that I bought it and finished it in one sitting.

For anyone (like me) whose parents never taught you about financial matters, I suggest you buy this IMMEDIATELY!

There are no definitive, practical instructions of how to get rich, but it will open your mind to the possibility. More importantly it will change the way you think about money forever.

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Digital Picture Frames – Great Gifts For Anyone

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Everyone loves to look at photographs of their friends and family! This is the key reason that digital picture frames make such great gifts. They are versatile, allowing nearly anyone to display favorite photos with ease and style.

Many people struggle with the holidays because of the constant worry about what kind of a gift to get. If you have a lot of people to shop for, and are bewildered by the variety of gifts on the market, look into digital picture frames first. These frames are great for nearly anyone you can put on your gift-giving list, because they can be as   unique  as the people receiving them.

What makes digital picture frames so exciting to give and receive? Part of the appeal lies in the fact that there is room for each person to customize his or her picture slide show. There is no end to the variety of photographs that can be loaded onto this gift, and it will continue to lend beauty and personality to any room for years to come.

While many gifts are obviously geared toward one age group or demographic, these digital picture frames can work just as well for the kids as for the retired set. Even people who are not tech-savvy can manage this simple system and enjoy the results. Grandparents love this gift because it allows them to have instant access to a ton of pictures of those precious grandkids!

College students tend to enjoy anything that is personalized and fun, and these digital picture frames are both. Give your college-bound graduate a way to see parents, siblings, or friends from home even when he or she is away at campus. The digital picture frames available can make any dorm room feel a bit more cozy and home-like.

If you are planning to attend a baby shower and have no idea what to get for the expectant parents, digital picture frames may be your best choice! This gift makes it easy for new parents to capture moments in time with their newborn. They will enjoy sharing the photo slideshows with everyone they know, and can keep their pictures in one spot with a minimum of fuss. Ease of use sets digital picture frames apart from the standard, one-photo frame many people use.

Christmas parties for the office can be a lot of fun, but they can also be stressful if you are clueless about the personal tastes of your co-workers. If you are going to be giving gifts at a business holiday event, digital picture frames can provide you with an easy solution. No matter who your gift ends up reaching, that person will have fun choosing photos that mean something personally. It is a classy gift that will never look out of place and will be sure to liven up an office desk.

If you have parents or friends that live far away, think about using digital picture frames as gifts and also as a way to stay in touch. You can pre-load the picture frame with meaningful photos of yourself with the recipient if you like – this will be a treasured keepsake! You can also use digital picture frames to tell the story of your year, loading it with photos of that great summer vacation or that first snowy afternoon. When you have found the last photo to make your montage “just right”, send it on to bring a smile to someone’s face.

A couple that is about to be married will also find digital picture frames to be very special. This technology allows them to keep their sweet memories on display for as long as they like!

Digital picture frames make great gifts for anyone who likes to view photos! Give the gift that can display a lifetime of special moments.

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Namibia From The Air

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Last October I joined the Schoeman family on one of the fly-in safaris they have been operating in Namibia’s Skeleton Coast region since the 1970s. Words won’t do justice to what was a real adventure, but hopefully this provides just a taster of the experience.

These incredible safaris began when Windhoek based lawyer, Louw Schoeman, realised the potential in this wilderness area for flying in small numbers of guests and giving them a ‘desert experience’. Over the years, his name became synonymous with the Skeleton Coast and his safaris became known in the international travel circles as a   unique  wilderness experience. In the late 1980s his sons Andre and Bertus became part of the team as pilot guides. They have now been joined by youngest brother, Henk, and latterly by Bertus’ wife Helga.

Today the family members take groups of up to eight guests into this beautiful and remote region. My three night, four day trip was hosted by husband and wife team Bertus and Helga, and even though John had raved about a similar trip a couple of years ago, I had no inkling of the experience to come.

Having already seen the majestic Sossusvlei Dunes and had a quick look around the Wolwedans Nature reserve which is also pretty special, I wasn’t sure the scenery could get any better. I was wrong – very wrong!

Our two planes set off from Wolwedans heading towards the coast with Helga and Bertus giving a running commentary on what was unfolding below us. We flew over the Sossusvlei dunes – almost more spectacular from the air than the ground – before turning north to fly along the Atlantic shoreline. Dropping down onto a deserted beach for lunch we had a chance to experience at first hand the howling wind and wild sea that caused misery to many ships in the past. Flying further up the coast during the afternoon was wonderful – just sitting back and watching the sea whiz past about 100 feet beneath us. Every now and then we’d swoop inland to look at a shipwreck, abandoned mining post or a seal colony before heading back out to skim the clear blue sea.

Around mid-afternoon we turned inland, flying over the spectacular grey/brown Ugab formations. After a couple of exhilarating circuits flying just above the peaks, we landed on a makeshift runway on a valley floor. After a brief walk to examine the extraordinary geology of the region we set off again for the short hop to the first night’s camp, leaving the planes parked for the night like two very lost large birds. After 20 minutes drive through a remote desert landscape we rounded a corner to be greeted by a small thatched mess tent with sundowners all ready. The camp was simple, but given the logistics of getting things to these remote wilderness areas this was not surprising, and the twin-bedded tents were perfectly comfortable with everything you need for the night.

Early morning coastal fog means flying tends to start around lunchtime, so our second morning was vehicle based, exploring the strange moonscape features of the area. Round each corner there was something different to look at, from ancient cave paintings and weirdly wonderful rock formations to welwitschia plants, a distant relative of the fir tree that lives for up to 2,000 years. Fascinating, and unlike anything I’ve seen before.

The highlight of the second afternoon’s flight was flamingo spotting. With no warning – the Schoemans love to surprise their guests – we flew over some man made salt pans and startled huge flocks of flamingos into the air with us. With cameras clicking like crazy, it was spectacular watching these graceful birds flying just below.

After another beach landing we set off into the coastal dunes of the Skeleton Coast National Park which were every bit as spectacular as Sossusvlei and far better for the fact that there was no one else around. We spent a wonderful couple of hours revelling in the sand but I can’t say more as it would spoil the surprises for anyone intending to do the trip themselves!

We arrived at Purros, the second night’s camp, as the sun was setting. Situated in the heart of the Kaokoland region – one of the last strongholds of the Himba tribes and home to the elusive desert elephant – the camp is idyllically located in a pretty, tree-lined sandy river bed with stunning views to the distant mountains.

There is more game in this area, but we got off to a shaky start the next morning when Bertus and his team had to add a large stone and a stick to the components under the bonnet of our game vehicle. The logistics of keeping mechanical things working in this environment must be enormous but they are all first-class mechanics, so we were soon moving again.

Among the things that really stick in my mind from this morning – apart from more glorious scenery – were the enormous flocks of ostrich we saw: 40, 50 and more, just wandering across the vast empty planes. Bertus knows the whole area like the back of his hand and was determined to find desert elephant: after some searching, he succeeded. A lone bull to begin with and then a few females. Taller and thinner than their non-desert counterparts, they have evolved over the years so that they can scratch out a living in this arid area. They don’t get many visitors but seemed quite content for us to sit and watch for a while.

Back in the planes, we landed briefly on the beach to search for multicoloured agate stones. This seriously challenged my 10kg baggage allowance but the stones still look every bit as lovely in their new home back in the UK. Then it was on up to Namibia’s northern border with Angola, where we turned inland to follow the Kunene River. As the coastal dunes gradually disappeared behind us we started to see the occasional crocodile in the water below.

Vehicles were waiting at the landing strip and we set off for the final camp of our trip. Just as it seemed we couldn’t be surprised by anything else, we dropped into the huge Hartmann Valley. What the early explorers must have felt when they reached this bit of land is anyone’s guess. Vast, empty, hostile and yet spectacularly beautiful. After winding along the valley floor, we climbed a hill to stop and look back. I was entranced by the seemingly endless orange/red landscape dotted with a few lone oryx, and perfectly framed by the distant Angolan mountains. Words could never do it justice, and sadly, nor do my photographs.

The following morning a gentle boat ride down the Kunene River, spotting birds and drinking in the river scenery, was the perfect way to wind down, before a final bit of excitement: prospecting for diamonds on the Angolan river shore. I felt as if I’d been away for weeks, not a couple of days, and had seen almost more than I could take in.

This doesn’t even begin to describe the adventure that is a Schoeman trip. It is by no means a luxury holiday. Accommodation and food are simple, and the packed itinerary is, at times, quite demanding. But I feel privileged to have experienced the guiding and knowledge imparted by Bertus and Helga. Bertus grew up here and his passion for all that we saw was infectious. I would be amazed if I experience another assault on my senses quite like these four days – but then I doubt there is anywhere else on earth quite like the Skeleton Coast.



http://www.aardvarksafaris.com/articles-namibia-fromtheair.htm

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Memories Before and After the Sound of Music – Book Review

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Agathe von Trapp, born in 1913, is the eldest daughter of Baron Georg von Trapp. Agathe, her siblings and parents formed the famous Trapp Family Singers, which inspired the popular film, The Sound Of Music.This famous movie was based on books written by Maria about their lives and experiences from her perspective, which – of course – the movie producers had creative license with. After reading Agathe’s memoir, Memories Before And After The Sound Of Music, interest for Maria’s books will likely increase once again.

When I took on this project I reminisced to my husband about the bonding moments I had with my mother because of the movie; he went out and promptly rented the DVD from our local store. I think it is wonderful that the movie has survived all these years and can still be found on movie rental shelves. Memories Before And After The Sound Of Music is likely to experience similar success, simply due to how dear the family’s story has been to the masses.

The book is written as a non-fiction account from Agathe’s memory – as such, readers will see the changing times through the eyes of the eldest daughter of the family. Perhaps due to the fact that Agathe was a young adult at the time, the story does not include the causes of the turmoil. Her bitterness seeps through here and there – and at times, I got the impression that she had once harbored unpleasant feelings towards Maria and the movie producers, which seem to have healed. Agathe’s child-like adoration of her biological parents is apparent in their heroic and greater-than-life portrayal – but then, perhaps they really were like that.

Readers will find that Agathe’s book will travel farther back in time, before Maria entered their lives. The biography follows through to what happened after their escape and clarifies common misconceptions. I found it surprising that Agathe was 25 when the family left for America – the only “children” during the escape were those recently born from Maria.

Though this family’s story is definitely and inspiring riches-to-rags story, one cannot deny that this well-connected family certainly did not suffer like their countrymen. Isolated castles and mansions, pristine lakes and mountains, private farms, fully staffed estates… no, this was certainly not suffering, by any account. However, the war left the family with nothing but the loyalty and love of their fans and friends. This was enough for them to survive Ellis Island, find a home in America, record albums, go on tours and establish a successful music camp – which is operating today in Vermont.

As a fantastic bonus, the center of the book contains over 30 pages of photos of the family starting in 1875 through to images of the family today, including one shot of the next Trapp family singing group.

Author: Agathe von Trapp

Publisher: Publish America

ISBN 10: 1-4137-6026-0

ISBN 13: 978-1-4137-6026-2

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A Look at Artificial Intelligence and Technology – Book Review

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It is fairly obvious that computers and artificial intelligence will run our world tomorrow, as we program these machines today. Interestingly enough, not long from now these AI machines will be programming themselves. How did we come so far so fast you ask? Well, maybe you need to do a little research for yourself.

If this topic interests you, then boy do I have a great book for you to read. It is a book that I own personally, and one I read a long time ago, but it still holds validity today, and many of the predictions of that past period, which is only two decades ago, although it seems like eons; the book is:

“The Connection Machine,” by W. Danny Hillis, MIT Press, MA, 1989, (208 pp), ISBN: 978-026258-0977.

This book is an extension of a highly controversial and ahead of its time MIT thesis by the same author. This book is not for the non-intellectual, and he gets pretty thick into the details and philosophy of parallel computing. This book was written well before massive Internet use, just as the computer technology in Silicon Valley was really taking off. Indeed, this is one of those books which was the prime mover of the time.

This is why I have it in my library, and why I recommend it to anyone who is into artificial intelligence, computer hardware, future software, or where we are go from here; why you ask – because if the past is any indication of the future, things are getting get pretty interesting in the next decade. In fact, I hope you will please consider this, and educate yourself a little in the past, so you can understand how far we’ve come, how fast we’ve come, and where we go from here. Think on it.

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